The association of basal cortisol levels with episodic memory in older adults is mediated by executive function

February 21, 2022 0 Comments

Elevated basal cortisol levels in elderly may indicate dysregulation of the internal stress-related system, as well as dysfunction and structural alterations in brain structures necessary for cognition, such as hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Because of the close relation of executive functions and episodic memory processing, in this study we explored whether the association of elevated cortisol levels on episodic memory could be partly attributed to cortisol effects on executive functions. In this cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a sample of 236 community-dwelling older adults from the Cretan Aging Cohort aged 75.56 ± 7.21 years [53 with dementia due to probable Alzheimer’s disease, 99 with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and 84 cognitively non-impaired participants (NI)]. Morning serum cortisol levels were higher in the probable AD as compared to the NI group (p = .031).
Mediated regression models in the total sample supported the hypothesis that the negative association of basal cortisol levels with delayed memory was fully mediated by the relation of basal cortisol levels with executive functions and immediate memory (adjusted for age and self-reported depression symptoms). Moderated mediation regression models revealed that the direct effect of cortisol on executive function and the effect of executive function on delayed memory performance were statistically significant among participants diagnosed with MCI, while the immediate memory effect on delayed memory was more pronounced in AD patients, as compared to the NI group. The current findings corroborate neuroimaging research highlighting cortisol effects on executive functions and immediate memory and further suggest that dysregulation of systems involved in these functions may account for the purported detrimental long-term effects of high cortisol levels on delayed memory.

Association of cancer caregiver stress and negative attribution style with depressive symptoms and cortisol: a cross-sectional study

Purpose: We examined the effect of informal cancer caregiver stress and negative attribution style (NAS) on depressive symptoms and salivary cortisol.
Method: The sample came from a hospital bone marrow unit and caregiver support organizations and included 60 informal cancer caregivers (51.7% partners) of individuals with cancer (provided care for a median of 27.5 h per week for 12 months) and 46 non-caregiver participants. In this cross-sectional study, participants completed questionnaires assessing NAS and depressive symptoms and provided saliva samples to measure cortisol.
Results: Linear regressions demonstrated that cancer caregiver stress (p = 0.001) and the cancer caregiver stress by NAS interaction (p = 0.017), but not NAS alone (p = 0.152), predicted depressive symptoms. Caregivers independent of their NAS and non-caregivers high in NAS reported high depression while non-caregivers low in NAS reported low depression. Neither cancer caregiver stress (p = 0.920) nor NAS alone (p = 0.114), but their interaction, predicted cortisol (p = 0.036). Higher NAS was associated with a higher cortisol in both groups while non-caregivers had higher cortisol than caregivers.
Conclusions: If the findings can be replicated, consideration of NAS in existing interventions to support informal cancer caregivers in managing chronic stress appears warranted.

Report from the HarmoSter study: impact of calibration on comparability of LC-MS/MS measurement of circulating cortisol, 17OH-progesterone and aldosterone

Objectives: Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is recommended for measuring circulating steroids. However, assays display technical heterogeneity. So far, reproducibility of corticosteroid LC-MS/MS measurements has received scant attention. The aim of the study was to compare LC-MS/MS measurements of cortisol, 17OH-progesterone and aldosterone from nine European centers and assess performance according to external quality assessment (EQA) materials and calibration.
Methods: Seventy-eight patient samples, EQA materials and two commercial calibration sets were measured twice by laboratory-specific procedures. Results were obtained by in-house (CAL1) and external calibrations (CAL2 and CAL3). We evaluated intra and inter-laboratory imprecision, correlation and agreement in patient samples, and trueness, bias and commutability in EQA materials.
Results: Using CAL1, intra-laboratory CVs ranged between 2.8-7.4%, 4.4-18.0% and 5.2-22.2%, for cortisol, 17OH-progesterone and aldosterone, respectively. Trueness and bias in EQA materials were mostly acceptable, however, inappropriate commutability and target value assignment were highlighted in some cases. CAL2 showed suboptimal accuracy. Median inter-laboratory CVs for cortisol, 17OH-progesterone and aldosterone were 4.9, 11.8 and 13.8% with CAL1 and 3.6, 10.3 and 8.6% with CAL3 (all p<0.001), respectively. Using CAL1, median bias vs. all laboratory-medians ranged from -6.6 to 6.9%, -17.2 to 7.8% and -12.0 to 16.8% for cortisol, 17OH-progesterone and aldosterone, respectively. Regression lines significantly deviated from the best fit for most laboratories. Using CAL3 improved cortisol and 17OH-progesterone between-method bias and correlation.
Conclusions: Intra-laboratory imprecision and performance with EQA materials were variable. Inter-laboratory performance was mostly within specifications. Although residual variability persists, adopting common traceable calibrators and RMP-determined EQA materials is beneficial for standardization of LC-MS/MS steroid measurements.

A Portable 3D Microfluidic Origami Biosensor for Cortisol Detection in Human Sweat

  • Analysis of cortisol levels in human sweat is increasingly important as it can be a “stress biomarker” in stress-related disorders, giving real-time information about human health status. In this study, a portable 3D microfluidic origami biosensor based on a smartphone was developed for cortisol-level detection in human sweat. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheet-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescently labeled aptamers were employed in the biosensing process. A multilayer-structured 3D origami microfluidic chip was fabricated and functionalized to facilitate low-volume perspired human sweat collection, transportation, and detection.
  • The translatability of the biosensor was exhibited by the fluorescence analysis in a smartphone mounted in a custom-designed holder. The critical design parameters of the microfluidic origami biosensor, including the characterization of various paper substrates, the concentration of MoS2 nanosheets, and the incubation/reaction time, were adjusted to obtain an acceptable range for the assay dynamic range and limit of detection (LOD).
  • Under optimum conditions, various doses of cortisol within the physiologically relevant range of 10-1000 ng/mL reported in human sweat were tested to evaluate the performance of the proposed biosensor. It displayed an LOD of 6.76 ng/mL at 3σ in artificial sweat, an analysis time of 25 min, and high selectivity. The performance of the proposed cortisol sensor was compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for a spiked artificial sweat sample, and a correlation coefficient of 0.988 was found.
  • The proposed biosensor also presented satisfactory results in the determination of the cortisol levels in a real human sweat sample. The resulting portable biosensor provides a rapid, low-cost, convenient, and non-invasive sensing solution for the point-of-care analysis of cortisol levels in sweat.

Cortisol (Cor) ELISA Kit

DLR-Cortisol-Ge-48T DL Develop 48T 562.8 EUR

Cortisol (Cor) ELISA Kit

DLR-Cortisol-Ge-96T DL Develop 96T 729.6 EUR

General Cortisol (Cor) ELISA Kit

RD-Cortisol-Ge-48Tests Reddot Biotech 48 Tests 560.4 EUR

General Cortisol (Cor) ELISA Kit

RD-Cortisol-Ge-96Tests Reddot Biotech 96 Tests 775.2 EUR

General Cortisol (Cor) ELISA Kit

RDR-Cortisol-Ge-48Tests Reddot Biotech 48 Tests 585.6 EUR

General Cortisol (Cor) ELISA Kit

RDR-Cortisol-Ge-96Tests Reddot Biotech 96 Tests 811.2 EUR

Cortisol (Cortisol) Antibody

abx120037-1mg Abbexa 1 mg 794.4 EUR

Cortisol (Cortisol) Antibody

20-abx131919 Abbexa
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  • 100 ug
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Cortisol (Cortisol) Antibody

abx021126-1mg Abbexa 1 mg 794.4 EUR

Cortisol (Cortisol) Antibody

abx021127-1mg Abbexa 1 mg 794.4 EUR

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abx021128-1mg Abbexa 1 mg 811.2 EUR

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abx021130-1mg Abbexa 1 mg 794.4 EUR

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abx021131-1mg Abbexa 1 mg 794.4 EUR

Cortisol (Cortisol) Antibody

abx022862-1ml Abbexa 1 ml 510 EUR

Cortisol (Cortisol) Antibody

20-abx210082 Abbexa
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Cortisol (Cortisol) CLIA Kit

abx195777-96tests Abbexa 96 tests 990 EUR

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AG186 Unibiotest 1 mg 627.6 EUR

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AT186 Unibiotest 1mg 1336.8 EUR

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E0016Ge Sunlong 1 Kit 582 EUR

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Porcine cortisol (Cortisol) ELISA Kit

QY-E40032 Qayee Biotechnology 96T 480 EUR

Cortisol Kit

55R-2267 Fitzgerald 1 Kit 660 EUR

Cortisol antibody

10-1546 Fitzgerald 100 ug 470.4 EUR

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10-C30D Fitzgerald 1 mg 232.8 EUR

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10141-05011 AssayPro 150 ug 260.4 EUR

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40141-05011 AssayPro 150 ug 260.4 EUR

Cortisol antibody

20-1410 Fitzgerald 100 ul 788.4 EUR

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10R-C145a Fitzgerald 1 mg 571.2 EUR

Hair Cortisol, Perceived Stress, and the Effect of Group Dynamics: A Longitudinal Study of Young Men during Compulsory Military Training in Lithuania

Previous research shows a nonlinear dependency between hair cortisol concentrations and perceived stress levels. This may be due to stress being targeted at the individual level despite it also being a social phenomenon which is often affected by group dynamics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the influence of perceived stress on the hair cortisol level, considering the impact of the variables of group dynamics (interpersonal, task, and norm cohesion). Information was collected on 11 groups of, in total, 112 young men in three phases of time during their compulsory military training (covering nine months in total). The classification and regression tree (C&RT) method was used to predict hair cortisol concentrations in groups.
The results show that the variability of the hair cortisol level in young men groups can be explained by perceived stress only when the groups were in formation process (47.7% normalised importance in Model 1) and when the groups were working on their final tasks (37.80% normalised importance in Model 3); meanwhile, the importance of perceived stress in explaining hair cortisol concentrations is low when the group is in a routine period of a group life-span (28.9% normalised importance in Model 2). Interpersonal cohesion (normalised importance 100% in Model 1 and 80.0% in Model 3) and task cohesion (normalised importance 78.6% in Model 2) were the most important predictors in the study area. These results point to the importance of the elements of group dynamics when it comes to explaining the nature of hair cortisol as accumulated stress biomarkers in young men.

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